Eats, Shoots and Leaves

Lynne Truss’s book isn’t new. (It was published in 2003.) However, it is still one of my favourites.

It is definitely one of the reasons my family has questioned my mental stability. There I sat, reading on the couch while they watched TV. From time to time, I would laugh aloud. (It takes a lot to make me laugh or cry when I’m reading a book, especially non-fiction.)

If you haven’t read Truss’s book, I encourage you to Google it. Take a look at the cover. If that was the only good thing about Eats.., I would considered it worth the retail price. The title…Absolutely brilliant!

Thankfully, the pandas and the gun aren’t the only brilliant elements of Truss’s work. (If you still haven’t Googled it, I bet you do now.) My favourite part inside the covers of this book about punctuation…yes, I said punctuation…is the Dear John letter. It is presented twice, back to back. Good writing? Not unless the author has a good reason. Since it’s a book about full stops (aka periods; Truss is British), exclamation points, semicolons, etc, it isn’t surprising to learn the only difference between paragraphs is the punctuation.

It may not sound particularly side-splitting, but you’ve got to get your hands on Eats, Shoots and Leaves. It may just make you laugh out loud, too–even if you’re not a writer or an editor.

Enjoy!

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